The New Town of Warsaw

Street in the New Town of Warsaw

Street in the New Town of Warsaw ©Hombit/Flick

Founded in the 14th century, the New Town of Warsaw lies in the north of the Old Town and was connected with it by the Freta street that start at Barbican defense tower. Until 1791, the New Town, known as the New Warsaw, worked independently, having a mayor, a parish church and several convents, but after that it was added to Warsaw, becoming its neighborhood.

During the uprising of 1944, the new town was completely destroyed by the Germans, when many historic buildings that served as hospitals and shelters for residents were razed to the ground. The reconstruction of the new city began in 1954.

 

The center of the New Town

The center of the New Town of Warsaw you will find the market, built until 1818 by the Town Hall, being replaced with a fountain built since 1958 near the intersection with the main road, Freta street, over witch are lying many cafes, restaurants and souvenir shops. Here you can find the Church of St. Casimir, built in between 1688-1689, the majority of the objects inside this Baroque place of worship dating back to the nineteenth century.

The New Town of Warsaw

The New Town of Warsaw ©paolotrabattoni it/Flick

The City of Churches

Because here are eight from the churches of Warsaw, the New Town is known as the City of Churches. Among these churches we first want to mention the Holy Spirit Church, built in 1717, being the starting point of the pilgrimage to the famous Polish town of Czestochowa. The St. Jacek Church, dating back to 1639, is has predominantly a Gothic architecture and the Church of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven or less formerly known as the Church of Saint Mary (Kościół Mariacki) is one of the oldest churches of Warsaw being founded in 1411 and built in Gothic style. The Church of St Francis is an other beautiful religious building that worth to be visited.

Churches in the New Town of Warsaw

Churches in the New Town of Warsaw ©y entonces/Flick

Other tourist attractions of the New Town

Besides the memorial dedicated to the heroes of the Warsaw Uprising in 1944 unveiled to the public in 1989, you can also visit the Raczynski Palace built in 1786, which today houses the city archives and the Sapieha Palace, built for the Lithuanian chancellor Jan Fryderyk Sapieha between 1731-1746 and now converted into a school.

Watched from the Vistula River, the New Town of Warsaw attracts thousands of tourists with its towers that dominate the air, the gardens that are piled up along the banks of the river, the imposing historic buildings and numerous churches and monasteries.

Street in the New Town of Warsaw

Street in the New Town of Warsaw ©Hombit/Flick

 

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