The Saxon Gardens in Warsaw

The Saxon Gardens in Warsaw

The Saxon Gardens in Warsaw ©Ana Paula Hirama/Flick

Stretching over an area of ​​15.5 ha from the Pilsudski Square to the Marszalkowska Street, the Saxon Gardens (Ogród Saski) is the oldest public park in Warsaw. It was opened to visitors on May 27, 1727 as one of the top parks in the world being accessible to locals and tourists.

Initially the Saxon Gardens in Warsaw represented the place where stood the defense walls of the city and the Saxon Palace, built in 1666 for the aristocrat Jan Andrzej Morsztyn. The size of the garden was then extended in the reign of King Augustus II, when he included it in the “Saxon Axis” a string of parks and palaces that connects the western end of Warsaw and the Vistula River.

The Saxon Gardens in Warsaw

The Saxon Gardens in Warsaw ©Ulf Liljankoski/Flick

The construction and development of the park

The construction plan of the park was designed after the one in Versailles, in French Baroque style, then in the nineteenth century was changed into an English style garden. At that time in the Saxon Gardens stood the three palaces: the Saxon Palace, the Bruhl Palace, the Blue Palace, as well as an opera house and a church.

The Saxon Gardens in Warsaw was destroyed after the outbreak of the Warsaw Rebellion in 1944, but partially rebuilt after the end of the Second World War. The only item that was rebuilt after the war is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, a place created in 1920 to commemorate the thousands of unknown soldiers who gave their lives to defend Poland. Today, there are held a number of official military ceremonies such as the National Independence Day Celebration on November 11.

The tomb of the unknown soldier in Warsaw

The tomb of the unknown soldier in Warsaw ©_gee_/Flick

The main attractions of the Saxon Gardens

Being located very close to downtown, the number of tourists visiting the Saxon Gardens in Warsaw has grown from year to year. The main tourist attractions within the garden include the 21 statues made of sandstone in baroque style, a part of the collection of sculptures moved to Sankt Petersburg after the recapturing of the city by Marshal Suvorov in 1794.

An other important attraction is the water tower, designed in 1852 and located in the north-western part of the Saxon Gardens, the Fountain, one of the most precious symbols of Warsaw being a famous meeting place for couples, the monument dedicated to Mary Konopnicka, a famous Polish poet, his work being especially dedicated to children and youth the Statue of Stefan Starzynski, the leader of the battle during the siege of Warsaw, unveiled in 1939 and many others.

The Saxon Gardens in Warsaw are opened all year round, at any time of day and the entry is free.

The Saxon Gardens in Warsaw

The Saxon Gardens in Warsaw ©Ana Paula Hirama/Flick

Leave a Reply